HISTORY of the CHRISTIAN CHURCH*

 

 

CONTENTS.

 

FROM BONIFACE VIII. TO MARTIN LUTHER. A.D. 1294–1517.

 

The Sixth Period of Church Histyry.

 

§ 1. Introductory Survey.

 

CHAPTER I.

 

THE DECLINE OF THE PAPACY AND THE AVIGNON

EXILE. A.D. 1294–1377.

 

§ 2. Sources and Literature.

§ 3. Pope Boniface VIII. 1294–1303.

§ 4. Boniface VIII. and Philip the Fair of France.

§ 5. Literary Attacks against the Papacy.

§ 6. The Transfer of the Papacy to Avignon.

§ 7. The Pontificate of John XXII 1316–1334.

§ 8. The Papal Office Assailed.

§ 9. The Financial Policy of the Avignon Popes.

§ 10. The Later Avignon Popes.

§ 11. The Re-establishment of the Papacy in Rome. 1377.

 

CHAPTER II.

 

THE PAPAL SCHISM AND THE REFORMATORY

COUNCILS. 1378–1449.

 

§ 12. Sources and Literature.

§ 13. The Schism Begun. 1378.

§ 14. Further Progress of the Schism. 1378–1409.

§ 15. The Council of Pisa.

§ 16. The Council of Constance. 1414–1418.

§ 17. The council of Basel. 1431–1449.

§ 18. The Council of Ferrara-Florence. 1438–1445.

 

CHAPTER III.

 

LEADERS OF CATHOLIC THOUGHT.

 

§ 19. Literature.

§ 20. Ockam and the Decay of Scholasticism.

§ 21. Catherine of Siena, the Saint.

§ 22. Peter d’Ailly, Ecclesiastical Statesman.

§ 23. John Gerson, Theologian and Church Leader.

§ 24. Nicolas of Clamanges, the Moralist.

§ 25. Nicolas of Cusa, Scholar and Churchman.

§ 26. Popular Preachers.

 

CHAPTER IV.

 

THE GERMAN MYSTICS.

 

§ 27. Sources and Literature.

§ 28. The New Mysticism.

§ 29. Meister Eckart.

§ 30. John Tauler of Strassburg.

§ 31. Henry Suso.

§ 32. The Friends of God.

§ 33. John of Ruysbroeck.

§ 34. Gerrit de Groote and the Brothers of the Common Life.

§ 35. The Imitation of Christ. Thomas à Kempis.

§ 36. The German Theology.

§ 37. English Mystics.

 

CHAPTER V.

 

REFORMERS BEFORE THE REFORMATION.

 

§ 38. Sources and Literature.

§ 39. The Church in England in the Fourteenth Century.

§ 40. John Wyclif.

§ 41. Wyclif’s Teachings.

§ 42. Wyclif and the Scriptures.

§ 43. The Lollards.

§ 44. John Huss of Bohemia.

§ 45. Huss at Constance.

§ 46. Jerome of Prag.

§ 47. The Hussites.

 

CHAPTER VI.

 

THE LAST POPES OF THE MIDDLE AGES. 1447–1521

 

§ 48. Literature and General Survey.

§ 49. Nicolas V. 1447–1455.

§ 50. Aeneas Sylvius de’ Piccolomini, Pius II.

§ 51. Paul II. 1464–1471.

§ 52. Sixtus IV. 1471–1484.

§ 53. Innocent VIII. 1484–1492.

§ 54. Pope Alexander VI—Borgia. 1492–1503.

§ 55. Julius II., the Warrior-Pope. 1503–1513.

§ 56. Leo X. 1513–1521.

 

CHAPTER VII.

 

HERESY AND WITCHCRAFT.

 

§ 57. Literature.

§ 58. Heretical and Unchurchly Movements.

§ 59. Witchcraft and its Punishment.

§ 60. The Spanish Inquisition.

 

CHAPTER VIII.

 

THE RENAISSANCE.

 

§ 61. Literature of the Renaissance.

§ 62. The Intellectual Awakening.

§ 63. Dante, Petrarca, Boccaccio.

§ 64. Progress and Patrons of Classical Studies in the 15th Century.

§ 65. Greek Teachers and Italian Humanists.

§ 66. The Artists.

§ 67. The Revival of Paganism.

§ 68. Humanism in Germany.

§ 69. Reuchlin and Erasmus.

§ 70. Humanism in France.

§ 71. Humanism in England.

 

CHAPTER IX.

 

THE PULPIT AND POPULAR PIETY.

 

§ 72. Literature.

§ 73. The Clergy.

§ 74. Preaching.

§ 75. Doctrinal Reformers.

§ 76. Girolamo Savonarola.

§ 77. The Study and Circulation of the Bible.

§ 78. Popular Piety.

§ 79. Works of Charity.

§ 80. The Sale of Indulgences.

 

CHAPTER X.

 

THE CLOSE OF THE MIDDLE AGES.

 

§ 81. The Close of the Middle Ages.

 

 



* Schaff, Philip, History of the Christian Church, (Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.) 1997. This material has been carefully compared, corrected¸ and emended (according to the 1910 edition of Charles Scribner's Sons) by The Electronic Bible Society, Dallas, TX, 1998.


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