HISTORY of the CHRISTIAN CHURCH*

 

 

CONTENTS.

 

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HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION.

 

1517 – 1648.

 

CHAPTER I.

 

ORIENTATION.

 

mediaeval and modern christianity

.

§ 1. The Turning Point of Modern History.

§ 2. Protestantism and Romanism.

§ 3. Necessity of a Reformation.

§ 4. The Preparations for the Reformation.

§ 5. The Genius and Aim of the Reformation.

§ 6. The Authority of the Scriptures.

§ 7. Justification by Faith.

§ 8. The Priesthood of the Laity.

§ 9. The Reformation and Rationalism.

§ 10. Protestantism and Denominationalism.

§ 11. Protestantism and Religious Liberty.

§ 12. Religious intolerance and Liberty in England and America.

§ 13. Chronological Limits.

§ 14. General Literature on the Reformation.

 

FIRSTBOOK.

 

THE GERMAN REFORMATION TILL THE DIET OF AUGSBURG,

1517–1530.

 

CHAPTER II.

 

LUTHER’S TRAINING FOR THE REFORMATION, (l483–1517).

 

§ 15. Literature of the German Reformation.

§ 16. Germany and the Reformation.

§ 17. The Luther Literature.

§ 18. Luther’s Youth and Training.

§ 19. Luther in the University of Erfurt.

§ 20. Luther’s Conversion.

§ 21. Luther as a Monk.

§ 22. Luther and Staupitz.

§ 23. The Victory of Justifying Faith.

§ 24. Luther Ordained to the Priesthood.

§ 25. Luther in Rome.

§ 26. The University of Wittenberg.

§ 27. Luther as Professor till 1517.

§ 28. Luther and Mysticism. The Theologia Germanica.

§ 29. The Penitential Psalms. The Eve of the Reformation.

 

CHAPTER III.

 

THE GERMAN REFORMATION FROM THE PUBLICATION OF LUTHER’S THESES TO THE DIET OF WORMS, (1517–1521).

 

§ 30. The Sale of Indulgences.

§ 31. Luther and Tetzel.

§ 32. The Ninety-five Theses. Oct. 31, 1517.

§ 33. The Theses-Controversy. 1518.

§ 34. Rome’s Interposition. Luther and Prierias. 1518.

§ 35. Luther and Cajetan. October, 1518.

§ 36. Luther and Miltitz. January, 1519.

§ 37. The Leipzig Disputation. June 27-July 15, 1519.

§ 38. Philip Melanchthon. Literature (Portrait).

§ 39. Melanchthon’s Training.

§ 40. Melanchthon’s Early Labors.

§ 41. Luther and Melanchthon.

§ 42. Ulrich von Hutten and Luther.

§ 43. Luther’s Crusade against Popery. 1520.

§ 44. Address to the German Nobility.

§ 45. The Babylonian Captivity of the Church. October, 1520.

§ 46. Christian Freedom.—Luther’s  Last Letter to the Pope. October, 1520.

§ 47. The bull of Excommunication. June 15, 1520.

§ 48. Luther burns the Pope’s bull, and forever breaks with Rome. Dec. 10, 1520.

§ 49. The Reformation and the Papacy.

§ 50. Charles V.

§ 51. The Ecclesiastical Policy of Charles V.

§ 52. The Abdication of Charles, and his Cloister Life.

§ 53. The Diet of Worms. 1521.

§ 54. Luther’s Journey to Worms.

§ 55. Luther’s Testimony before the Diet. April 17 and 18, 1521.

§ 56. Reflections on Luther’s Testimony at Worms.

§ 57. Private Conferences with Luther. The Emperors Conduct.

§ 58. The Ban of the Empire. May 8 (26), 1521.

§ 59. State of Public Opinion. Popular Literature.

 

CHAPTER IV.

 

THE GERMAN REFORMATION FROM THE DIET OF WORMS TO THE PEASANTS’ WAR, (1521–1525).

 

§ 60. A New Phase in the History of the Reformation.

§ 61. Luther at the Wartburg. 1521–1522.

§ 62. Luther’s Translation of the Bible.

§ 63. A Critical Estimate of Luther’s Version.

§ 64. Melanchthon’s Theology.

§ 65. Protestant Radicalism. Disturbances at Erfurt.

§ 66. The Revolution at Wittenberg. Carlstadt and the New Prophets.

§ 67. Luther returns to Wittenberg.

§ 68. Luther restores Order in Wittenberg.—The End of Carlstadt.

§ 69. The Diets of Nuernberg, A.D. 1522–1524. Adrian VI.

§ 70. Luther and Henry VIII

§ 71. Erasmus.

§ 72. Erasmus and the Reformation.

§ 73. The Free-will Controversy. 1524–1527.

§ 74. Wilibald Pirkheimer.

§ 75. The Peasants’ War. 1523–1525.

 

CHAPTER V.

 

THE INNER DEVELOPMENT OF THE REFORMATION FROM THE

PEASANTS’ WAR TO THE DIET OF AUGSBURG, (1525–1530).

 

§ 76. The Three Electors.

§ 77. Luther’s Marriage. 1525.

§ 78. Luther’s Home Life.

§ 79. Reflections on Clerical Family Life.

§ 80. Reformation of Public Worship.

§ 81. Prominent Features of Evangelical Worship.

§ 82. Beginnings of Evangelical Hymnody.

§ 83. Common Schools.

§ 84. Reconstruction of Church Government and Discipline.

§85. Enlarged Conception of the Church. Augustin, Wiclif, Hus, Luther.

§ 86. Changes in the Views on the Ministry. Departure from the Episcopal Succession. Luther ordains a Deacon, and consecrates a Bishop.

§ 87. Relation of Church and State.

§ 88. Church Visitation in Saxony.

§ 89. Luther’s Catechisms. 1529.

§ 90. The Typical Catechisms of Protestantism.

 

CHAPTER VI.

 

PROPAGATION AND PERSECUTION OF PROTESTANTISM.

 

§ 91. Causes and Means of Progress.

§ 92. The Printing-Press and the Reformation.

§ 93. Protestantism in Saxony.

§ 94. The Reformation in Nuernberg.

§ 95. The Reformation in Strassburg. Martin Bucer.

§ 96. The Reformation in North Germany.

§ 97. Protestantism in Augsburg and South Germany.

§ 98. The Reformation in Hesse, and the Synod of Homberg. Philip of Hesse, and Lambert of Avignon.

§ 99. The Reformation in Prussia. Duke Albrecht and Bishop Georg Von Polenz.

§ 100. Protestant Martyrs.

 

CHAPTER VII.

 

THE SACRAMENTARIAN CONTROVERSIES.

 

§ 101. Sacerdotalism and Sacramentalism.

§ 102. The Anabaptist Controversy. Luther and Huebmaier.

§ 103. The Eucharistic Controversy.

§ 104. Luther’s Theory before the Controversy.

§ 105. Luther and Carlstadt.

§ 106. Luther and Zwingli.

§ 107. The Marburg Conference, A.D. 1529. (With Facsimile of Signatures.)

§ 108. The Marburg Conference continued. Discussion and Result.

§ 109. Luther’s Last Attack on the Sacramentarians. His Relation to Calvin.

§ 110. Reflections on the Ethics of the Eucharistic Controversy.

§ 111. The Eucharistic Theories compared. Luther, Zwingli, Calvin.

 

CHAPTER VIII.

 

THE POLITICAL SITUATION BETWEEN 1526 AND 1529.

 

§ 112. The First Diet of Speier, and the Beginning of the Territorial System. 1526.

§ 113. The Emperor and the Pope. The Sacking of Rome, 1527.

§ 114. A War Panic, 1528.

§ 115. The Second Diet of Speier, and the Protest of 1529.

§ 116. The Reconciliation of the Emperor and the Pope.

The Crowning of the Emperor. 1529.

 

CHAPTER IX.

 

THE DIET AND CONFESSION OF AUGSBURG. (1530).

 

§ 117. The Diet of Augsburg.

§ 118. The Negotiations, the Recess, the Peace of Nuernberg.

§ 119. The Augsburg Confession.

§ 120. The Roman Confutation and the Protestant Apology.

§ 121. The Tetrapolitan Confession.

§ 122. Zwingli’s Confession to the Emperor Charles.

§ 123. Luther at the Coburg.

§ 124. Luther’s Public Character, and Position in History.

§ 125. Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott.

 

 



* Schaff, Philip, History of the Christian Church, (Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.) 1997. This material has been carefully compared, corrected¸ and emended (according to the 1910 edition of Charles Scribner's Sons) by The Electronic Bible Society, Dallas, TX, 1998.


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